Hanami::Controller

Complete, fast and testable actions for Rack and Hanami

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Contact

  • Home page: http://hanamirb.org
  • Mailing List: http://hanamirb.org/mailing-list
  • API Doc: http://rdoc.info/gems/hanami-controller
  • Bugs/Issues: https://github.com/hanami/controller/issues
  • Chat: http://chat.hanamirb.org
  • Chat: https://gitter.im/hanami/chat

Rubies

Hanami::Controller supports Ruby (MRI) 2.2+

Installation

Add this line to your application’s Gemfile:

ruby gem 'hanami-controller'

And then execute:

shell $ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

shell $ gem install hanami-controller

Usage

Hanami::Controller is a micro library for web frameworks. It works beautifully with Hanami::Router, but it can be employed everywhere. It’s designed to be fast and testable.

Actions

The core of this framework are the actions. They are the endpoints that respond to incoming HTTP requests.

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

def call(params) @article = ArticleRepository.find params[:id] end end ```

The usage of Hanami::Action follows the Hanami philosophy: include a module and implement a minimal interface. In this case, the interface is one method: #call(params).

Hanami is designed to not interfere with inheritance. This is important, because you can implement your own initialization strategy.

An action is an object. That’s important because you have the full control on it. In other words, you have the freedom to instantiate, inject dependencies and test it, both at the unit and integration level.

In the example below, the default repository is ArticleRepository. During a unit test we can inject a stubbed version, and invoke #call with the params. We’re avoiding HTTP calls, we’re also going to avoid hitting the database (it depends on the stubbed repository), we’re just dealing with message passing. Imagine how fast the unit test could be.

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

def initialize(repository = ArticleRepository) @repository = repository end

def call(params) @article = @repository.find params[:id] end end

action = Show.new(MemoryArticleRepository) action.call({ id: 23 }) ```

Params

The request params are passed as an argument to the #call method. If routed with Hanami::Router, it extracts the relevant bits from the Rack env (eg the requested :id). Otherwise everything is passed as is: the full Rack env in production, and the given Hash for unit tests.

With Hanami::Router:

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

def call(params) # … puts params # => { id: 23 } extracted from Rack env end end ```

Standalone:

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

def call(params) # … puts params # => { :”rack.version”=>[1, 2], :”rack.input”=>#<StringIO:0x007fa563463948>, … } end end ```

Unit Testing:

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

def call(params) # … puts params # => { id: 23, key: ‘value’ } passed as it is from testing end end

action = Show.new response = action.call({ id: 23, key: ‘value’ }) ```

Whitelisting

Params represent an untrusted input. For security reasons it’s recommended to whitelist them.

```ruby require ‘hanami/validations’ require ‘hanami/controller’

class Signup include Hanami::Action

params do required(:first_name).filled(:str?) required(:last_name).filled(:str?) required(:email).filled(:str?)

required(:address).schema do
  required(:line_one).filled(:str?)
  required(:state).filled(:str?)
  required(:country).filled(:str?)
end   end

def call(params) # Describe inheritance hierarchy puts params.class # => Signup::Params puts params.class.superclass # => Hanami::Action::Params

# Whitelist :first_name, but not :admin
puts params[:first_name]     # => "Luca"
puts params[:admin]          # => nil

# Whitelist nested params [:address][:line_one], not [:address][:line_two]
puts params[:address][:line_one] # => '69 Tender St'
puts params[:address][:line_two] # => nil   end end ```

Validations & Coercions

Because params are a well defined set of data required to fulfill a feature in your application, you can validate them. So you can avoid hitting lower MVC layers when params are invalid.

If you specify the :type option, the param will be coerced.

```ruby require ‘hanami/validations’ require ‘hanami/controller’

class Signup MEGABYTE = 1024 ** 2 include Hanami::Action

params do required(:first_name).filled(:str?) required(:last_name).filled(:str?) required(:email).confirmation.filled?(:str?, format?: /@/) required(:password).confirmation.filled(:str?) required(:terms_of_service).filled(:bool?) required(:age).filled(:int?, included_in?: 18..99) optional(:avatar).filled(size?: 1..(MEGABYTE * 3)) end

def call(params) halt 400 unless params.valid? # … end end

action = Signup.new

action.call(valid_params) # => [200, {}, …] action.errors.empty? # => true

action.call(invalid_params) # => [400, {}, …] action.errors.empty? # => false

action.errors.fetch(:email) # => [‘is missing’, ‘is in invalid format’] ```

Response

The output of #call is a serialized Rack::Response (see #finish):

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

def call(params) # … end end

action = Show.new action.call({}) # => [200, {}, [””]] ```

It has private accessors to explicitly set status, headers, and body:

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

def call(params) self.status = 201 self.body = ‘Hi!’ self.headers.merge!({ ‘X-Custom’ => ‘OK’ }) end end

action = Show.new action.call({}) # => [201, { “X-Custom” => “OK” }, [“Hi!”]] ```

Exposures

We know that actions are objects and Hanami::Action respects one of the pillars of OOP: encapsulation. Other frameworks extract instance variables (@ivar) and make them available to the view context.

Hanami::Action’s solution is the simple and powerful DSL: expose. It’s a thin layer on top of attr_reader.

Using expose creates a getter for the given attribute, and adds it to the exposures. Exposures (#exposures) are a set of attributes exposed to the view. That is to say the variables necessary for rendering a view.

By default, all Hanami::Action objects expose #params and #errors.

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

expose :article

def call(params) @article = ArticleRepository.find params[:id] end end

action = Show.new action.call({ id: 23 })

assert_equal 23, action.article.id

puts action.exposures # => { article: <Article:0x007f965c1d0318 @id=23> } ```

Callbacks

It offers a powerful, inheritable callback chain which is executed before and/or after your #call method invocation:

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

before :authenticate, :set_article

def call(params) end

private def authenticate # … end

# params in the method signature is optional def set_article(params) @article = ArticleRepository.find params[:id] end end ```

Callbacks can also be expressed as anonymous lambdas:

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

before { … } # do some authentication stuff before { |params| @article = ArticleRepository.find params[:id] }

def call(params) end end ```

Exceptions management

When an exception is raised, it automatically sets the HTTP status to 500:

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

def call(params) raise end end

action = Show.new action.call({}) # => [500, {}, [“Internal Server Error”]] ```

You can map a specific raised exception to a different HTTP status.

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action handle_exception RecordNotFound => 404

def call(params) @article = ArticleRepository.find params[:id] end end

action = Show.new action.call(‘unknown’) # => [404, {}, [“Not Found”]] ```

You can also define custom handlers for exceptions.

```ruby class Create include Hanami::Action handle_exception ArgumentError => :my_custom_handler

def call(params) raise ArgumentError.new(“Invalid arguments”) end

private def my_custom_handler(exception) status 400, exception.message end end

action = Create.new action.call({}) # => [400, {}, [“Invalid arguments”]] ```

Exception policies can be defined globally, before the controllers/actions are loaded.

```ruby Hanami::Controller.configure do handle_exception RecordNotFound => 404 end

class Show include Hanami::Action

def call(params) @article = ArticleRepository.find params[:id] end end

action = Show.new action.call(‘unknown’) # => [404, {}, [“Not Found”]] ```

This feature can be turned off globally, in a controller or in a single action.

```ruby Hanami::Controller.configure do handle_exceptions false end

or

module Articles class Show include Hanami::Action

configure do
  handle_exceptions false
end

def call(params)
  @article = ArticleRepository.find params[:id]
end   end end

action = Articles::Show.new action.call(‘unknown’) # => raises RecordNotFound ```

Inherited Exceptions

```ruby class MyCustomException < StandardError end

module Articles class Index include Hanami::Action

handle_exception MyCustomException => :handle_my_exception

def call(params)
  raise MyCustomException
end

private

def handle_my_exception
  # ...
end   end

class Show include Hanami::Action

handle_exception StandardError => :handle_standard_error

def call(params)
  raise MyCustomException
end

private

def handle_standard_error
  # ...
end   end end

Articles::Index.new.call({}) # => handle_my_exception will be invoked Articles::Show.new.call({}) # => handle_standard_error will be invoked, # because MyCustomException inherits from StandardError ```

Throwable HTTP statuses

When #halt is used with a valid HTTP code, it stops the execution and sets the proper status and body for the response:

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

before :authenticate!

def call(params) # … end

private def authenticate! halt 401 unless authenticated? end end

action = Show.new action.call({}) # => [401, {}, [“Unauthorized”]] ```

Alternatively, you can specify a custom message.

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

def call(params) DroidRepository.find(params[:id]) or not_found end

private def not_found halt 404, “This is not the droid you’re looking for” end end

action = Show.new action.call({}) # => [404, {}, [“This is not the droid you’re looking for”]] ```

Cookies

Hanami::Controller offers convenient access to cookies.

They are read as a Hash from Rack env:

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’ require ‘hanami/action/cookies’

class ReadCookiesFromRackEnv include Hanami::Action include Hanami::Action::Cookies

def call(params) # … cookies[:foo] # => ‘bar’ end end

action = ReadCookiesFromRackEnv.new action.call(=> ‘foo=bar’) ```

They are set like a Hash:

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’ require ‘hanami/action/cookies’

class SetCookies include Hanami::Action include Hanami::Action::Cookies

def call(params) # … cookies[:foo] = ‘bar’ end end

action = SetCookies.new action.call({}) # => [200, => ‘foo=bar’, ‘…’] ```

They are removed by setting their value to nil:

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’ require ‘hanami/action/cookies’

class RemoveCookies include Hanami::Action include Hanami::Action::Cookies

def call(params) # … cookies[:foo] = nil end end

action = RemoveCookies.new action.call({}) # => [200, => “foo=; max-age=0; expires=Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:00 -0000”, ‘…’] ```

Default values can be set in configuration, but overriden case by case.

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’ require ‘hanami/action/cookies’

Hanami::Controller.configure do cookies max_age: 300 # 5 minutes end

class SetCookies include Hanami::Action include Hanami::Action::Cookies

def call(params) # … cookies[:foo] = { value: ‘bar’, max_age: 100 } end end

action = SetCookies.new action.call({}) # => [200, => “foo=bar; max-age=100;”, ‘…’] ```

Sessions

It has builtin support for Rack sessions:

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’ require ‘hanami/action/session’

class ReadSessionFromRackEnv include Hanami::Action include Hanami::Action::Session

def call(params) # … session[:age] # => ‘31’ end end

action = ReadSessionFromRackEnv.new action.call({ ‘rack.session’ => { ‘age’ => ‘31’ }}) ```

Values can be set like a Hash:

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’ require ‘hanami/action/session’

class SetSession include Hanami::Action include Hanami::Action::Session

def call(params) # … session[:age] = 31 end end

action = SetSession.new action.call({}) # => [200, “Set-Cookie”=>”rack“Set-Cookie”=>”rack.session=…”, “…”] ```

Values can be removed like a Hash:

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’ require ‘hanami/action/session’

class RemoveSession include Hanami::Action include Hanami::Action::Session

def call(params) # … session[:age] = nil end end

action = RemoveSession.new action.call({}) # => [200, “Set-Cookie”=>”rack“Set-Cookie”=>”rack.session=…”, “…”] it removes that value from the session ```

While Hanami::Controller supports sessions natively, it’s session store agnostic. You have to specify the session store in your Rack middleware configuration (eg config.ru).

ruby use Rack::Session::Cookie, secret: SecureRandom.hex(64) run Show.new

Http Cache

Hanami::Controller sets your headers correctly according to RFC 2616 / 14.9 for more on standard cache control directives: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2616#section-14.9.1

You can easily set the Cache-Control header for your actions:

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’ require ‘hanami/action/cache’

class HttpCacheController include Hanami::Action include Hanami::Action::Cache

cache_control :public, max_age: 600 # => Cache-Control: public, max-age=600

def call(params) # … end end ```

Expires header can be specified using expires method:

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’ require ‘hanami/action/cache’

class HttpCacheController include Hanami::Action include Hanami::Action::Cache

expires 60, :public, max_age: 600 # => Expires: Sun, 03 Aug 2014 17:47:02 GMT, Cache-Control: public, max-age=600

def call(params) # … end end ```

Conditional Get

According to HTTP specification, conditional GETs provide a way for web servers to inform clients that the response to a GET request hasn’t change since the last request returning a Not Modified header (304).

Passing the HTTP_IF_NONE_MATCH (content identifier) or HTTP_IF_MODIFIED_SINCE (timestamp) headers allows the web server define if the client has a fresh version of a given resource.

You can easily take advantage of Conditional Get using #fresh method:

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’ require ‘hanami/action/cache’

class ConditionalGetController include Hanami::Action include Hanami::Action::Cache

def call(params) # … fresh etag: @resource.cache_key # => halt 304 with header IfNoneMatch = @resource.cache_key end end ```

If @resource.cache_key is equal to IfNoneMatch header, then hanami will halt 304.

The same behavior is accomplished using last_modified:

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’ require ‘hanami/action/cache’

class ConditionalGetController include Hanami::Action include Hanami::Action::Cache

def call(params) # … fresh last_modified: @resource.update_at # => halt 304 with header IfModifiedSince = @resource.update_at.httpdate end end ```

If @resource.update_at is equal to IfModifiedSince header, then hanami will halt 304.

Redirect

If you need to redirect the client to another resource, use #redirect_to:

```ruby class Create include Hanami::Action

def call(params) # … redirect_to ‘http://example.com/articles/23’ end end

action = Create.new action.call({ article: { title: ‘Hello’ }}) # => [302, => ‘/articles/23’, ‘’] ```

You can also redirect with a custom status code:

```ruby class Create include Hanami::Action

def call(params) # … redirect_to ‘http://example.com/articles/23’, status: 301 end end

action = Create.new action.call({ article: { title: ‘Hello’ }}) # => [301, => ‘/articles/23’, ‘’] ```

MIME Types

Hanami::Action automatically sets the Content-Type header, according to the request.

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

def call(params) end end

action = Show.new

action.call({ ‘HTTP_ACCEPT’ => ‘/’ }) # Content-Type “application/octet-stream” action.format # :all

action.call({ ‘HTTP_ACCEPT’ => ‘text/html’ }) # Content-Type “text/html” action.format # :html ```

However, you can force this value:

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

def call(params) # … self.format = :json end end

action = Show.new

action.call({ ‘HTTP_ACCEPT’ => ‘/’ }) # Content-Type “application/json” action.format # :json

action.call({ ‘HTTP_ACCEPT’ => ‘text/html’ }) # Content-Type “application/json” action.format # :json ```

You can restrict the accepted MIME types:

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action accept :html, :json

def call(params) # … end end

When called with “*/*” => 200

# When called with “text/html” => 200 # When called with “application/json” => 200 # When called with “application/xml” => 406 ```

You can check if the requested MIME type is accepted by the client.

```ruby class Show include Hanami::Action

def call(params) # … # @_env[‘HTTP_ACCEPT’] # => ‘text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9’

accept?('text/html')        # => true
accept?('application/xml')  # => true
accept?('application/json') # => false
self.format                 # :html



# @_env['HTTP_ACCEPT'] # => '*/*'

accept?('text/html')        # => true
accept?('application/xml')  # => true
accept?('application/json') # => true
self.format                 # :html   end end ```

Hanami::Controller is shipped with an extensive list of the most common MIME types. Also, you can register your own:

```ruby Hanami::Controller.configure do format custom: ‘application/custom’ end

class Index include Hanami::Action

def call(params) end end

action = Index.new

action.call({ ‘HTTP_ACCEPT’ => ‘application/custom’ }) # => Content-Type ‘application/custom’ action.format # => :custom

class Show include Hanami::Action

def call(params) # … self.format = :custom end end

action = Show.new

action.call({ ‘HTTP_ACCEPT’ => ‘/’ }) # => Content-Type ‘application/custom’ action.format # => :custom ```

Streamed Responses

When the work to be done by the server takes time, it may be a good idea to stream your response. Here’s an example of a streamed CSV.

```ruby Hanami::Controller.configure do format csv: ‘text/csv’ middleware.use ::Rack::Chunked end

class Csv include Hanami::Action

def call(params) self.format = :csv self.body = Enumerator.new do |yielder| yielder « csv_header

  # Expensive operation is streamed as each line becomes available
  csv_body.each_line do |line|
    yielder << line
  end
end   end end ```

Note: * In development, Hanami’ code reloading needs to be disabled for streaming to work. This is because Shotgun interferes with the streaming action. You can disable it like this hanami server --code-reloading=false * Streaming does not work with WEBrick as it buffers its response. We recommend using puma, though you may find success with other servers

No rendering, please

Hanami::Controller is designed to be a pure HTTP endpoint, rendering belongs to other layers of MVC. You can set the body directly (see response), or use Hanami::View.

Controllers

A Controller is nothing more than a logical group of actions: just a Ruby module.

```ruby module Articles class Index include Hanami::Action

# ...   end

class Show include Hanami::Action

# ...   end end

Articles::Index.new.call({}) ```

Hanami::Router integration

While Hanami::Router works great with this framework, Hanami::Controller doesn’t depend on it. You, the developer, are free to choose your own routing system.

But, if you use them together, the only constraint is that an action must support arity 0 in its constructor. The following examples are valid constructors:

```ruby def initialize end

def initialize(repository = ArticleRepository) end

def initialize(repository: ArticleRepository) end

def initialize(options = {}) end

def initialize(*args) end ```

Please note that this is subject to change: we’re working to remove this constraint.

Hanami::Router supports lazy loading for controllers. While this policy can be a convenient fallback, you should know that it’s the slower option. Be sure of loading your controllers before you initialize the router.

Rack integration

Hanami::Controller is compatible with Rack. However, it doesn’t mount any middleware. While a Hanami application’s architecture is more web oriented, this framework is designed to build pure HTTP endpoints.

Rack middleware

Rack middleware can be configured globally in config.ru. However, consider that they often add unnecessary overhead for all endpoints that aren’t direct users of all the configured middleware.

Think about a middleware to create sessions, where only SessionsController::Create needs that middleware, but every other action pays the performance price for that middleware.

The solution is that an action can employ one or more Rack middleware, with .use.

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’

module Sessions class Create include Hanami::Action use OmniAuth

def call(params)
  # ...
end   end end ```

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’

module Sessions class Create include Hanami::Controller

use XMiddleware.new('x', 123)
use YMiddleware.new
use ZMiddleware

def call(params)
  # ...
end   end end ```

Configuration

Hanami::Controller can be configured with a DSL. It supports a few options:

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’

Hanami::Controller.configure do # Handle exceptions with HTTP statuses (true) or don’t catch them (false) # Argument: boolean, defaults to true # handle_exceptions true

# If the given exception is raised, return that HTTP status # It can be used multiple times # Argument: hash, empty by default # handle_exception ArgumentError => 404

# Register a format to MIME type mapping # Argument: hash, key: format symbol, value: MIME type string, empty by default # format custom: ‘application/custom’

# Define a fallback format to detect in case of HTTP request with Accept: */* # If not defined here, it will return Rack’s default: application/octet-stream # Argument: symbol, it should be already known. defaults to nil # default_request_format :html

# Define a default format to set as Content-Type header for response, # unless otherwise specified. # If not defined here, it will return Rack’s default: application/octet-stream # Argument: symbol, it should be already known. defaults to nil # default_response_format :html

# Define a default charset to return in the Content-Type response header # If not defined here, it returns utf-8 # Argument: string, defaults to nil # default_charset ‘koi8-r’

# Configure the logic to be executed when Hanami::Action is included # This is useful to DRY code by having a single place where to configure # shared behaviors like authentication, sessions, cookies etc. # Argument: proc # prepare do include Hanami::Action::Sessions include MyAuthentication use SomeMiddleWare

before { authenticate! }   end end ```

All of the global configurations can be overwritten at the controller level. Each controller and action has its own copy of the global configuration.

This means changes are inherited from the top to the bottom, but do not bubble back up.

```ruby require ‘hanami/controller’

Hanami::Controller.configure do handle_exception ArgumentError => 400 end

module Articles class Create include Hanami::Action

configure do
  handle_exceptions false
end

def call(params)
  raise ArgumentError
end   end end

module Users class Create include Hanami::Action

def call(params)
  raise ArgumentError
end   end end

Users::Create.new.call({}) # => HTTP 400

Articles::Create.new.call({}) # => raises ArgumentError because we set handle_exceptions to false ```

Thread safety

An Action is mutable. When used without Hanami::Router, be sure to instantiate an action for each request. The same advice applies when using Hanami::Router but NOT routing to mycontroller#myaction but instead routing direct to a class.

```ruby # config.ru require ‘hanami/controller’

class Action include Hanami::Action

def self.call(env) new.call(env) end

def call(params) self.body = object_id.to_s end end

run Action ```

Hanami::Controller heavely depends on class configuration. To ensure immutability in deployment environments, use Hanami::Controller.load!.

Versioning

Hanami::Controller uses Semantic Versioning 2.0.0

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request

Copyright © 2014-2016 Luca Guidi – Released under MIT License

This project was formerly known as Lotus (lotus-controller).